I’m not a fan of heavy science fiction in literature. Nor am I a big fan of reading about sports. So if you had ever asked me to read a science fiction book based on a football team in the future, I would have gagged involuntarily and choked on my own vomit. But after reading Scott Sigler‘s INFECTED (our review) I have been following his work. Any author who can write scenes as exquisitely cringe-worthy as the ones contained in that book has gotten my interest. So when THE ROOKIE was finally released I was hesitant to purchase a novel about sports. I’ve only read one book from him – that’s far from a commitment, ya’ know? But then I read the synopsis: “Set in a lethal pro football league 700 years in the future, THE ROOKIE is a story that combines the intense gridiron action of  ANY GIVEN SUNDAY with the space opera style of STAR WARS and the criminal underworld of THE GODFATHER.  Aliens and humans alike play positions based on physiology, creating receivers that jump 25 feet into the air, linemen that bench-press 1,200 pounds, and linebackers that literally want to eat you.

Review: Meatball Machine

July 18, 2009 at 9:19 pm by  

Craving a Japanese horror, sci-fi love story? Who isn’t? Well Yûdai Yamaguchi and Jun’ichi Yamamoto’s Meatball Machine should stifle those cravings, even if its just for a little bit. It’s quite splatastic, involving alien parasites who use human bodies as their own personal battle stations, turning their hosts into bio-mechanical messes called Necroborgs. If you are one of the unlucky individuals who has one of these aliens enter your body, you find yourself completely at the mercy of your invader as you are forced to track down other Necroborg’s and engage in battles to the bloody death. The weapons used vary, but in every case these weapons are built out of you – the alien using advanced technology to transform your flesh into a variety of weapons. …

Allow me to begin with a warning: Eden Log is a dark film. And by “dark,” I mean dim. And by “dim,” I don’t mean unintelligent. I mean, you better not be watching this film on an old-school LCD or with any ambient light in the room. The best way to view this flick is by unbolting your plasma from the wall and crawling under a blanket with it. But wait! Is there anything in this film worth seeing? What in the world is this French film even about? It’s a tough question, because Eden Log defies categorization. Director Franck Vestiel didn’t create a horror film, because there’s nothing scary about it. The creatures that inhabit the film’s dismal underworld are always kept at bay. Often, this is done with the clever use of saran wrap, a foil on violence not matched since M. Night Shamalamalahayha introduced space-faring aliens that were flummoxed by doorknobs. Other times, the creatures are just annoying, screeching backdrop. They run past our protagonist harmlessly. Or Eden Log Guards traverse a gangway on a different level–more far-off non-threats.…

In the future, the world’s energy problems have almost been completely solved with Earth no longer suffering from the cost of electricity and the environmental pratfalls associated with fossil fuels. 70 percent of all power needs are now being handled by Helium 3, a clean burning fuel harvested from rocks on the moon. Lunar Industries is a corporation that places massive, automated harvesters on the moon’s surface to gather the Helium 3, using a lone employee to oversee the operations from within the Selene moon base. This employee honors a 3-year contract before a replacement is sent to the moon and he then returns to Earth. In Moon, Sam Bell (Sam Rockwell) is one of these Lunar Industry employees with only two weeks left on his contract. He is anxious to get back home to his wife and young daughter and it couldn’t happen at a better time, as lately he has been experiencing hallucinations and deteriorating health. Things get a bit more complicated while on a routine patrol to check on a harvester, when he is involved in an accident that has him waking up in the stations infirmary with his new replacement – an identical version of himself.…

Daniel Suarez’s Daemon is an amazing story.  And I’m not talking about the actual plot; for that, the word “Amazing” would not suffice.  No, I am referring to the incredible series of events which are leading up to its publication and release on January 8th. After writing Daemon back in 2004, Suarez faced the uphill battle common to many first-time authors.  Unable to find a buyer, yet confident of the quality of his work, he decided to self-publish.  Using print-on-demand, Suarez pumped out a few dozen copies a month, at the time sporting the pseudonym of Leinad Zeraus, his real name spelled backwards. Eventually the book achieved an underground and vocal following.  A tipping point of sorts was reached, and the right people began promoting the book in whatever way they could, people like Craig, of Craigslist fame and Rick Klau, at Feedburner (now owned by Google).  This network helped boost sales until the bright folks at Dutton publishing realized that a phenomenal author was going ignored.…

Hector is a a simple guy enjoying a quiet afternoon at his country home doing a little bird watching. While doing so, he spies upon a young woman undressing in the nearby woods. His curiosity gets the better of him and he decides to take a trek into the forest to get a closer look. Once in the woods, he is attacked from behind by a masked man sending Hector fleeing deeper into the woods. With the man in hot pursuit, Hector finds refuge at a closed research facility and comes across a lone technician (played by the director, Nacho Vigalondo). He helps Hector by letting him to hide inside a peculiar looking container. When Hector emerges a few seconds later, he finds that the container was actually a beta time-machine, and that he is now a few hours in the past. Having effectivel alluded the man chasing him, Hector finds he now exists with a past version of himself. He is informed by the technician that he must not interact with that version or there will be dire consequences.…


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