Blair Maynard (Michael Caine) is a reporter who decides to do a little investigative reporting on boats going missing in the region famously known as The Bermuda Triangle. Also going along for the trip to the Caribbean is Blair’s 12-year-old son, Justin. Blair soon finds out that there are no supernatural forces to blame for the missing ships but something just as fascinating. The ships are going missing because of a group of modern day pirates that have been operating in the area undetected for over 300 years. Blair and Justin are taken prisoner by the pirates for different, but equally disturbing reasons and taken to their secret hideaway. Now Blair must save himself and his son, and find a way off of – The Island!…

“We got on the wrong shuttle” – Melanie

Melanie (Peyton List) and Jules (Cameron Goodman) return from a quick trip to Mexico, only to have their weekend of fun and sun dampened by air-sickness and the airline losing Melanie’s luggage. To make the situation worse, the shuttle they were forced to use to take them home, has experienced a flat tire in a rough neighborhood. But things aren’t all bad, as they are in the company of Seth (James Snyder) and Matt (Dave Power), two young men they met while at the airport. But what starts out as a simple series of disappointments, turns into a nightmare for the passengers of this particular shuttle, when it is revealed that the driver (Tony Curran)  never had any attention of delivering them safely to their desired destination.…

Here, Now – Who Can Kill A Child? is a woefully, and criminally overlooked horror movie made in 1976 filmed in various locations around the beautiful, Southern coast of Spain. It’s a terrific horror film that was ahead of it’s time and, over the years, fans were treated to a variety of shitty VHS and DVD releases – the US version being one that was hacked all to hell. But with the recent Dark Sky DVD release of the film, I decided it was time to point horror fans to an obscure film in the killer kid genre that is worth checking out.

Tom (Lewis Fiander) and Evelyn (Prunella Ransome) are an English couple vacationing in Spain. Evelyn is 6-months pregnant with their third child and Tom, a professor of Biology, has brought her to the coastal town of Benivas to rest while he rents a boat to get to their true destination; The island of Almanzora. A four hour trip by boat, the island is not normally flooded with tourists like the noisy Benivas.…

Review: Taken – Asskicking At Its Finest

June 19, 2009 at 6:55 pm by  

Bryan (Liam Neeson) has recently retired from his job working for the government and is attempting to make up for time lost with Kim (Maggie Grace), his teenage daughter. But when she takes a trip to Paris she is abducted, along with with her best friend, mere hours after getting off the plane. An Albanian crime ring now has her and her friend, and they intend on selling them to the highest bidder. Bryan now has 96 hours to locate and rescue his daughter, or statistically, Kim will spend the rest of her life forced into prostitution, forever lost to the foreign slave trade.I am sure that by now you have heard at least one person talk about what a fun, ass-kicking film this is, so now with it out on DVD and Blu-Ray, you get to hear it again.…

A young couple from the city embark on a weekend trip involving camping on the banks of the beautiful, secluded Eden Lake. But their romantic getaway is interrupted by a nasty group of unruly teens who also happen to be hanging out on the same shore. Jenny (Kelly Reilly), a young, pretty school teacher attempts to ignore them at first but their antics become increasingly hostile. Her boyfriend, Steve (Michael Fassbender), attempts to resolve the issue by simply reasoning with the group. This does not go too well and a minor altercation escalates to deadly proportions, with the couple finding themselves fighting for their lives as they are hunted down in the dense forest surrounding Eden Lake.…

Got a confession to make. I am not a giant Sam Raimi fan. I know, some are already calling for my Horror Movie Lover’s card, but hear me out. Sure, the Evil Dead series are horror classics, introducing us to the world of splatstick. I sincerely appreciate both films and understand their place in horror movie history. But when it comes to his library of films, I just don’t like the majority of them too much. A Simple Plan, Spiderman 2 and especially The Gift (let’s see if I can hear some gnashing of teeth when I admit that I like this film better than the Dead ones) are about it for me. So when the news came out that Raimi was returning to his roots and his next film would be horror, my level of excitement didn’t really waver much in either direction. So what did Raimi deliver? A damn good horror movie is what. A Tales From the Crypt-ish, Poltergeist-y horror film sporing the PG-13 rating that showed off all the things fans of Raimi love to see, and hopefully enough gooey stuff and demon hi-jinx to stave off – at least for a little while – Evil Dead fans still waiting for a sequel.…

Allow me to begin with a warning: Eden Log is a dark film. And by “dark,” I mean dim. And by “dim,” I don’t mean unintelligent. I mean, you better not be watching this film on an old-school LCD or with any ambient light in the room. The best way to view this flick is by unbolting your plasma from the wall and crawling under a blanket with it. But wait! Is there anything in this film worth seeing? What in the world is this French film even about? It’s a tough question, because Eden Log defies categorization. Director Franck Vestiel didn’t create a horror film, because there’s nothing scary about it. The creatures that inhabit the film’s dismal underworld are always kept at bay. Often, this is done with the clever use of saran wrap, a foil on violence not matched since M. Night Shamalamalahayha introduced space-faring aliens that were flummoxed by doorknobs. Other times, the creatures are just annoying, screeching backdrop. They run past our protagonist harmlessly. Or Eden Log Guards traverse a gangway on a different level–more far-off non-threats.…

Wolf Creek (2005)

April 17, 2009 at 4:17 am by  

Two young girls, Liz (Cassandra Magrath) and Kristy (Kestie Morassi), are on an Australian road-trip with Ben (Nathan Phillips) a city boy from Sydney. One of their destinations is the massive meteor crater located in the Wolf Creek National Park. After making the hike to the center of the crater, they return to find that their car will not start. Seeing as they are in the middle of nowhere with a storm quickly approaching, they decide to camp out in the car until morning. As night envelopes them, their luck turns as they are discovered by a friendly bushman named Mick (John Jarratt) who offers to tow them to his garage where he would fix their car and they could be on their way. With no other viable options to choose from, the three decide to take Mick up on his offer but once back at Mick’s camp, these three youths find that Mick is not that nice of a guy. In fact, he is the most vile, evil human being they will ever have the displeasure of meeting.…

Not long after arriving at her sister’s remote manor to spend Christmas vacation, Elaine’s two youngest children begin showing flu-like symptoms. Within 24 hours, her sister’s two children are showing the same symptoms. But along with the sniffling noses and vomiting, the children have also started to demonstrate another unhealthy characteristic. They seem to be actively plotting the deaths of their parents. Now the only thing that is stopping the children from accomplishing their goal is Elaine’s rebellious, teen daughter Casey. But she is having trouble getting the adults to believe her, their denial prohibiting them from taking appropriate action before it is too late.…

Sometimes I get worried when I am writing about a favorite movie of mine, as I have a habit of trying to convince the reader that it is as good as I think it is. I worry that I will hype the film so much, that if anyone reads what I wrote about it, they will be sorely disappointed once they sit down to watch the film as it had no chance in hell of ever living up to the viewing pleasure I had promised. This is especially true for films that I may have watched as a kid, when things like nostalgia can give my figurative glasses a rosy tint. So I will try to contain my fanboism over the film I want to discuss: James Foley‘s 1986 film, ‘At Close Range’.…

I had many films to choose from to kick off this new column, but in the end I decided to jump-start Crime Screen with one of my all-time favorite true crime films, Peter Jackson‘s Heavenly Creatures. After making his mark on the horror community with two splatter classics, Bad Taste and Dead Alive, and before he directed The Lord of the Rings, Peter Jackson chose a real-life murder case as his first mainstream film.  The movie is based on the 1954 New Zealand murder of Honora Rieper, committed by her teenage daughter, Pauline Parker, and her best friend, Juliet Hulme. The two girls lured the woman to a remote trail where they bludgeoned her to death with a brick. The motive behind the crime was an act of desperation to keep the girls from being separated. Juliet was being sent to South Africa, and the girls thought that by killing Pauline’s mother, Pauline would then be allowed to with Juliet and they would remain together. Things did not go as planned.…

In the future, the world’s energy problems have almost been completely solved with Earth no longer suffering from the cost of electricity and the environmental pratfalls associated with fossil fuels. 70 percent of all power needs are now being handled by Helium 3, a clean burning fuel harvested from rocks on the moon. Lunar Industries is a corporation that places massive, automated harvesters on the moon’s surface to gather the Helium 3, using a lone employee to oversee the operations from within the Selene moon base. This employee honors a 3-year contract before a replacement is sent to the moon and he then returns to Earth. In Moon, Sam Bell (Sam Rockwell) is one of these Lunar Industry employees with only two weeks left on his contract. He is anxious to get back home to his wife and young daughter and it couldn’t happen at a better time, as lately he has been experiencing hallucinations and deteriorating health. Things get a bit more complicated while on a routine patrol to check on a harvester, when he is involved in an accident that has him waking up in the stations infirmary with his new replacement – an identical version of himself.…


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