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DENVER, CO — An 82-year-old man died inside a parking garage elevator after he got stuck inside and no one answered his calls for help.

Isaak Komisarchik, who suffers from dementia, was reported missing after he was last seen wearing pajamas at 2:30 p.m. July 5 at a nearby nursing facility.

Search crews posted missing person posters as they looked for the man, and Denver firefighters ended up searching five nearby ponds.

It would be almost a month later before anyone learned Komisarchik’s fate, and it was quite horrific.

Turns out that Komisarchik had wandered nearly a mile away to the Woodstream Village apartments, where he got inside an elevator attached to a parking garage that had been closed for renovations.

For reasons unknown at this time, the man was unable to get out. During an 8-minute period, the poor guy twice used the elevator’s emergency call button, but no help came.

“The pushing of the call button did trigger a notification to the elevator management company, MEI Total Elevator Solutions. The elevator management company then notified the apartment managers, Greystar Management Services,” police spokesman Doug Schepman said.

For reasons inexplicable reason, staff at the Woodstream Village apartments checked two elevators but not the elevator Komisarchik was stuck in.

It wasn’t until almost a month later, despite residents complaining about a foul odor emanating from the area, that Komisarchik’s badly decomposed body was found by elevator maintenance workers.

Komisarchik’s autopsy has been completed, but his cause of death is still undetermined because of how badly his body had decomposed before it was found. Investigators are looking into why the elevator was not checked despite Komisarchik using the help button.

“The elevator wasn’t inoperable,” said John White, spokesman for Denver police.

Greystar Management Services is refusing to answer questions from reporters, which is smart, but released the following statement:

“We are saddened by the tragic loss of life and extend our deepest condolences to Mr. Komisarchik’s family and friends. The elevator cab where he was found is located in a parking garage that is under renovation construction and not currently in active use. We are continuing to investigate the circumstances surrounding the incident with the local authorities.”

Between this story and the missing woman found rotting on a roof, I think the day I have to start wearing a diaper is the day I outfit myself with a GPS implant.

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Comments


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  • That’s awful Krystal Nicole

  • How terrible

  • NinaRoss009

    This is just sad

  • WTFOMGLOL

    You should have kept pushing that damn button, old man, until the fucktards came to the RIGHT elevator. They would have found me with my thumb glued to it.

  • The Dreamin’ Demon check your inbox. I came across a couple stories for your page.

  • modianos

    try the forums

  • Give Morbid some edible panties and a bottle of King Cobra.

  • Sara

    Yeah…I wonder why he didn’t keep pressing it. Maybe he thought it wasn’t working. Maybe he had a heart attack or some other immediate medical problem and died after he hit the button the second time. Still…I’m with you; if physically capable, I’d be hitting that button the way a sugared-up kid hits their grandma’s doorbell. Dingdingdingdingding! Dingdingdingdingding! Then again, I have to be forced to use elevators. I don’t like them. The thought of being stuck in one horrifies me to no end. That poor man. 🙁

  • itsknotme

    Was it an Odor-This elevator?

  • jansav

    he had dementia.

  • jansav

    he had dementia

  • jansav

    that is so sad. that poor man locked in that elevator probably not understanding what was happening. Notice the story doesn’t delve into the fact that he wandered away from a nursing home.

  • mean birch

    No, it was an Otis.

  • Sejanus

    I can’t even imagine dying like this.

  • Josh

    I don’t trust elevators.

  • Sara

    True. From other articles I read, he was in the early stages and was lucid most of the time. Maybe stress added more confusion to a not so lucid moment? I admit, I am no expert on dementia. I just know it’s horrible to watch a loved one go through it.

    My great-grandmother suffered from severe dementia in her final years and it was heartbreaking. The absolute worst part of it was that Granma was a concentration camp survivor in WWII and because of the dementia, that’s where she thought she was in her final years. We’d go to have dinner with her and have to leave the dining room because she’d insist on giving everyone at the table all her food. She’d say, “No, none for me…feed the children”. She’d attempt to hide under her bed when anyone came into her room. If someone was in her room chatting with her and someone came in, she’d try to hide them. It must have been awful for her, to be stuck in the worst time of her life, all of the many good parts erased, with no hope of reprieve. And it must have been even worse for the guy in this article, to be stuck in an elevator, confused, afraid and, worst of all, alone.

  • Sara

    Same here. Death traps just waiting to malfunction with victims inside!

  • Big Stan

    I hate elevator’s but my work force me to use it because of my recent Epilepsy diagnosis. The stress of being in the elevator is more likely to cause a seizure than walking up an down stairs. Not like I have an elevator to use at home anyway.

  • PurpleAnn

    What a kind heart she had! Still trying to take care of others.

  • PurpleAnn

    Since when are stairs a seizure trigger? Are they lit by strobing disco lights?

  • Big Stan

    They are not at all but my work freaked out after my diagnosis and are covering their asses in the off chance I fall down the stairs. My seizures are not currently under control so I can see their point a bit but it still sucks.

  • PurpleAnn

    Sounds like multiple people dropped the ball. Most elder care facilities put electronic bracelets on the residents that alarm when they get too near a door. Morbid’s idea of a GPS tracker is fantastic. With the technology available, they could outfit a wristband with a small one. Cheaper than a lawsuit!

  • Inferus

    I guess his elevator doesn’t go all the way to the top…in more ways than one.

  • Inferus

    So wouldn’t he forget he pressed it and press it again?

  • Inferus

    You forget you already said that? Time to get the tracking device.

  • Inferus

    I’d wander from a nursing home in a right state of mind. Being warehouse is not my idea of retirement

  • jansav

    people don’t go to nursing homes to retire.

  • jansav

    no he would get confused and forget what the buttons were for. Maybe even think that if he pushed the button the doors would never open.

  • jansav

    I realize you think you are being clever but you aren’t.

  • Elizabeth McCarthy

    Bless his heart. I can’t imagine how that must have been for him. I hate elevators.
    Sara, your great grandmother was a saint.

  • Inferus

    I know that. Retirement also is the term for post employment/ golden years.

  • Inferus

    I am. You’re just being a tad bitter. Is it age or life choices giving you the grumps?

  • Inferus

    Humor is seriously lost on you.

  • Inferus
  • jansav

    There is no humor for this situation. Get back to me after you watch a loved one die from some form of dementia. Lets see if you want to crack fuckin jokes then.

  • Inferus

    Why the hell are you here then? Morbid curiousity? Get off the stump, hypocrite.

  • PurpleAnn

    Oh, I see. Hopefully once you’ve been seizure-free for a period of time, they’ll back off. I wish you well, Stan.

  • jansav

    do you read these things to make you laugh? Is that what you are saying?

  • PurpleAnn

    Mine either. When I can no longer care for myself, (or be taken care of in my home)
    I want to end it with dignity.

  • PurpleAnn

    We are not laughing at this poor man’s death. Humor is a way of coping with the bleakness of life. Some of the most tasteless jokes are told by those in the health care field. My uncle died of Alzheimer’s, and he loved jokes.

    (One great thing about having Alzheimer’s……You get to meet new people every day.)

  • jansav

    this guy was.

  • Inferus

    Old fashioned. Love it!

  • Josh

    The thing has its ups and downs….

  • Sara

    She was a very kind, loving person. 🙂 We all miss her dearly.

    And I’m not a fan of elevators, either. Or escalators. I know they have their uses, but the thought of being trapped, dropped or sucked under scares me silly! When people come to harm on them, it reinforces the fear.

  • Sara

    Yes, she was extremely altruistic. After the war, she raised her kids (alone. My great-grandpa was killed in the war and Granma never remarried and she never removed her wedding ring) and when the last one was out of the house, she went overseas to help others. She finally retired in her late 80s, when the dementia became apparent. Her whole life was about everyone else. It was painful to see her slipping away, little by little, but we stayed by her. She would have done the same for us. If there’s a heaven, she’s there. 🙂

  • PurpleAnn

    Sounds like the start of a fun Saturday night.

  • PurpleAnn

    When it’s time to step on an escalator, I suddenly get all uncoordinated and move like a newborn calf. When it’s almost time to get off, I hyper-focus on the edge to get the timing right. (I know I’m a spaz.)

  • esmerald 2006

    Dementia would make you forget you “want to end it with dignity ” did you forget about it already?

  • Big Stan

    Thanks, it has turned my life upside down. I have had lots of sick absence because of it and can no longer drive which makes sense obviously. I am in the process of changing jobs anyway I have had enough of this place after 12 years. Been here since I was 18 and have no ambition to go any further up the ranks. An ocean of computer screens everywhere I look does not help me either, they start to jump about and join together etc like an acid trip when I am about to seize.

  • Josh

    The edge can grab a loose shoelace.

  • Diva of Destruction

    Wonder if they’ll keep using the elevator? Not sure hosing it out and hanging a pine air freshener will work in this case. What a horrible way to die. Hope a heart attack or something ended it quickly rather than starving to death standing in his own waste.

  • PurpleAnn

    Yes, exactly!

  • Sara

    Don’t feel bad; I, too, am a spaz. 🙂 I have extremely poor gross motor coordination and am prone to tripping over my own feet on the best of days. On a moving staircase with a moving handrail? A fall is all but assured. To make matters worse, when I was a child, my mother told me that escalators can suck someone under and chew them up to a bloody pulp. I know that’s not the case now and that she only said that because she was worried I’d wander off, but it instilled a lifelong fear of escalators.

  • Sara

    Mostly its downs…ohhhhh…I see what you did there! Ha, ha! Good one! 🙂

  • Sara

    Oh, yes…companies tend to overreact in the most inappropriate ways to things they know next to nothing about. And of course, it’s not the person’s health they’re concerned with. If that were the case, they’d take into account that stress is a huge trigger for seizures. All they care about is their own liability. I’m sorry you’re going through that. Seizures are…unpleasant. Especially the aftermath (at least for me, the aftermath is worse.)

  • WTFOMGLOL
  • Inferus
  • Scout Kent

    It’s still the case in China, so be careful in your travels.

  • PurpleAnn

    Well, escalators do have those teeth when you are getting on or off! I remember a few years back, there were signs telling people to be careful if they were wearing Crocs. Evidently, the shoes are so squishy that they could get caught in the moving parts. Yikes! So, we are right to be afraid. Escalators want to eat us.

  • Josh

    Then Ann would be purple 🙁

  • Mazikeen666

    Sad poor guy ,good idea GPS implant

  • BLRII

    I can’t even read this story. It’s just too horrible. Poor demented elderly man.

  • Big Stan

    I actually work for UK Government at the minute but they are not really any more understanding. I finish work here in 4 weeks so I am not too bothered though. I have about 20-30 partial seizures throughout the work day due to minor stress, just small absences of about 20 seconds or so but I drop whatever I am carrying and stare into space for a while like a lunatic. Recently I have started walking in circles before going into a grand mal seizure which is a pretty obvious warning sign to people who know me that it is coming and there is nothing to be done but wait for it to end. The aftermath is about 4 days of exhaustion, muscle soreness and headaches so I agree the aftermath is worse but I hate the idea of this shit in public and ppl thinking I am insane or high. I have only once been able to stop it myself through sensory deprivation (dark room, lay down try to relax) , although I have probably brought it on more times myself just by thinking/worrying about it too much

  • LynnKayee

    Avoid anything “closed for renovations” at all costs. Be it public roads to just a store, that is usually just code for “put a cone up and we will be back in a year.” Maybe. How was he able to get in but not out? And the checking other elevators sounds like a dash of bullshit.

  • LynnKayee

    That’s so tough. But it’s awesome you all seemed to work with it as best as you can. What utter torment to be frozen in time of any traumatic situation…but hers, that’s literal torture. I’m so sorry. Recently my grandmother has gone down hill from dementia that seemed to be brought on my an emergency surgery a couple years ago. There are good days, but fewer and fewer. She forgot she had cervical cancer and was treated with experimental radiation that literally burned her insides out and scar tissue closed her vagina. Can’t imagine what must cross her mind about it and had no clue what happened. Then she’d forget my dad, her son, is dead. When it hit her there were times she’d go to his house and luckily his neighbors knew her. But for her to relive the loss of her son on a loop was nightmarish enough. Can’t imagine what you went through. I really do think it’s beautiful though that your family, even if it’s a few or a ton, stuck around. Especially under such circumstances.

  • Josh

    The turn of a key can change how the keypad works, I’ve been in some where I had to hold the button the entire time to get doors to close and change floors.

  • Da Mac

    What landed her in a concentration camp, if I may ask?

  • Da Mac

    Since when may an employer dictate the means of transport of their employees?!? Americans don’t even know what rights are anymore…

  • Sara

    It was ultimately a case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time, the place being Manila, Philippines and the time being 1942. Most people hear “concentration camp” and immediately think of the Holocaust and assume my family is Jewish or some other demographic considered undesirable by the Nazis. But no, my great-grandparents were American missionaries in Hong Kong.

    My great-grandpa sent Granma and their kids to Manila (US territory at the time) to escape the Second Sino-Japanese War that was raging on a little too close for comfort. No one at the time thought that the Japanese would dare to attack the US. And, as Hong Kong was British territory, it was believed to be somewhat safe, as well. So he stayed behind in Hong Kong to continue his work.

    Except… The Japanese invaded the Philippines on the same day that they attacked Pearl Harbor. And shortly after, they invaded Hong Kong and my great-grandfather was one of the first civilian casualties. When they invaded the Philippines, one of the first things they did was to round up all foreigners and send them to the University of Santo Tomas, which became a concentration camp.

    The Japanese were, thankfully, not wanting to commit mass genocide, so in that way, my family was lucky, but the Japanese were still incredibly brutal and cruel. My great-grandmother and her children (one of whom is my paternal grandmother) had front row seats to such atrocities as the Bataan Death March and the Battle of Manila. They were also starved, nearly to the point of death (if liberation had come even a month later, they would have all died), and my grandmother, in particular, was beaten so badly by a Japanese soldier that it left her deaf in one ear.

  • Sara

    I’m so sorry your grandmother is going through all that pain…that must be terrifying for her, to see that something on her body has changed and have no recollection as to how it happened. Or to live through the loss of her child over and over…Dementia is a cruel condition. I didn’t realize just how cruel it was until I saw my great-grandma trapped in the worst time of her life with death as her only hope of reprieve.

    There’s no way we would have left her to deal with all that alone, no matter how hard it was at times to keep up a cheerful demeanor. It was what she needed, to see us smiling. And, I think that made it bearable for us, too. 🙂

  • Big Stan

    I am in the UK but yes I agree, they are just worried about a claim if I was to seize and fall down the stairs. Only a couple more weeks left of work here anyway then on to greener pastures

  • Night Nurse

    You are correct.