Patreon

Caregiver Caught On Camera Raping Elderly Alzheimer's PatientMarcos Ortega Faces New Charges After Driving With Man Stuck In WindshieldMan Lives After Setting Self On Fire At Gas Station, Cutting Throat With Ice ScraperFresno State Student Caught having Sex With Sheep Blames ExamsKwan Chow Accused Of Fondling Young Boys in ‘Dave & Buster’s’ BathroomWoman Cut Off Three-Year-Old Nephew’s Penis Because He Wanted To Use Her PhoneTeen Stops Half Naked Man From Raping His MotherToddler Mauled To Death By Family Pig After Crawling Into Its PenMother Files Claim Against Teacher Who "Caged" Disabled Daughter In ClassTwo Teen Girls Accused Of Trying To Have Man Murdered For $2000

HUNTSVILLE— Cary Kerr, 46,  has been on Huntsville Prison death row since his 2003 conviction of sexually assaulting and strangling 34-year-old Pamela Norton. She was killed after he pushed her from a moving vehicle. He has always professed his innocence, even though the evidence showed otherwise.

The jury agreed with prosecutors and convicted him of the charges and decided the world would be a better place if Kerr was removed from it, agreeing he was a suitable candidate for the death penalty.

Yesterday was his date with the needle and aside from having a last meal that consisted of cheeseburger and fries, spaghetti and lasagna, pizza, fried mushrooms, tacos, pork ribs, fried and baked chicken, quiche, and ice cream, he was also the first recipient of Texas’ new drug combo used during lethal injections.

Sodium thiopental is one of the three drugs used in lethal injections and is no longer available. So now pentobarbital will be used in its place. This new mixture was administered to Kerr at 6:14 yesterday evening and by 6:19 he was pretty dead, proving the new drug combo works pretty well.

Kerr tried to have his execution delayed, stating his attorney’s had failed him during his appeal, but the U.S. Supreme Cour denied his request. Kerr’s last words were, “The state of Texas, I am an innocent man. Never trust a court-appointed attorney. I am ready, warden.” Then, right before the concoction was put into his body he took a deep breath. “Here we go,” he said. He took two more deep breaths, then slurred “Lord Jesus, Jesus,” before joining all the other Christians in Heaven.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Want to help keep Dreamin' Demon independent and uncensored? Here's how

Comments


The views expressed in the comments are those of the comment writers and don't represent the views or opinions of D'D or its staff. Feel free to flag comments that may violate conditions outlined in our Disclaimer.

  • Anonymous

    I do like the way Texas does things! Bye Bye Creep!

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    Morbid I am a true Christian – so your “joining all the other Christians in Heaven.” comment offended me at first … then I was like “ya know Morbid is correct … this “Lord Jesus, Jesus,” guy is probably requesting water at this very minute,as we type these comments …

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    Sometimes people who use words like “Lord Jesus, Jesus,” do so because they realize a statement Marines at my old base in Yuma Az. used a lot is true “Hell is a local phone call.”

  • Gee

    Texas is no mess around kinda state! You better hope your never wrongly convicted there. No time to prove your innocence.

    *No I’m not claiming this guy was innocent

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I live in Texas and actually we give them way too much time … they can sit on our Death row 10 years or more;if they have good attorneys and the appeals are accepted.We are trying to get the time trimmed to something more reasonable – like 6 months.

  • Anonymous

    well all I can say to that is he never owned up to what he did…. soooooo…. I would have to say he was grasping at straws without true remorse for his actions… just my opinion…. but I believe the pathway to forgiveness includes more than just calling on Jesus at the last minute most definately!!!! Some of my most indepth discusions with my children and other young-uns about God have been about this very thing…. how can people who do things like this be forgiven… looking at it through thier eyes can be soul searing.

  • Jury

    Yeah the guy claims he’s innocent, he takes her home from the bar they were at, and is the last one to see her alive, the first one to see her dead on the side of a road when paramedics arrive , makes up a bogas story, his seaman is in her and her purse is in his car. Yeah, he’s innocent.

  • Jury

    Yeah the guy claims he’s innocent, he takes her home from the bar they were at, and is the last one to see her alive, the first one to see her dead on the side of a road when paramedics arrive , makes up a bogas story, his seaman is in her and her purse is in his car. Yeah, he’s innocent.

  • Jury

    Yeah the guy claims he’s innocent, he takes her home from the bar they were at, and is the last one to see her alive, the first one to see her dead on the side of a road when paramedics arrive , makes up a bogas story, his seaman is in her and her purse is in his car. Yeah, he’s innocent.

  • Jury

    Yeah the guy claims he’s innocent, he takes her home from the bar they were at, and is the last one to see her alive, the first one to see her dead on the side of a road when paramedics arrive , makes up a bogas story, his seaman is in her and her purse is in his car. Yeah, he’s innocent.

  • Anonymous

    WOW…. i wonder how he EVER got convicted! :P

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7S6FCMXMG7CMZG54WLODK53DG4 Cyn

    BuBye!!! and Good Riddance!!! Piece of Shit!

  • Gee

    Well I’m in California and no one screws around with death row inmates longer then us. As a matter of fact I just read in the LA Times “California backs off on plan to resume executions this year” http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-0504-executions-20110504,0,7815958.story
    Our Death row inmates die of old age here in sunny CA

  • Gee

    Well I’m in California and no one screws around with death row inmates longer then us. As a matter of fact I just read in the LA Times “California backs off on plan to resume executions this year” http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-0504-executions-20110504,0,7815958.story
    Our Death row inmates die of old age here in sunny CA

  • http://www.dreamindemon.com Morbid

    Well, if he accepted Jesus into his heart as his Lord and Savior and asked forgiveness for his sins, then he is going to Heaven. I wasn’t aware a murderer or rapist was barred from the Kingdom of God.

  • Gee

    The problem I have with this (6 months) is there have been a lot of people who were wrongly convicted. DNA evidence has proved that. How many people do you think could have possibly been innocent and were put to death. I used to be a devote death penalty believer but given all that has happen I am not so hard nosed about it. Justice system is flawed and Death is permanent. Not saying there are some who don’t deserve the death penalty. I just think we need to be more diligent when the death penalty is on the table

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_RK5MAF2VNT32ULNYFIXDANTEC4 Terence
  • Parrot Toes

    6 months will never happen. The wait time between sentencing and execution is necessary and on average is no earlier than 10 years any where in the States. It is getting longer and longer with time. The reasons for that are to accommodate all the appeals and whatever else comes up. I think it’s a great idea. The longer that a prisoner is on death row, the worse his mental anguish will be. Many of them attempt suicide because the mental anguish is so great. They spend 23 hours of each day in their small cells. They are isolated from all the other prisoners. Prison would suck, but life on death row would be Hell on Earth.

    Also, if there were any chance that the prisoner was innocent (it does and has happened), then hopefully that time will prove it one way or the other. It is incredibly sad for the victims and their friends and families for their loss, but it is equally sad for someone and their friends and family to be put to death if innocent.

    Here is a little chart for ya taken from http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/time-death-row which they got from somewhere on the Bureau of Justice Statistics site. It shows how the wait times have gone up since 1977 (well, since before then really, but this chart starts in ’77).

    http://i54.tinypic.com/1or2ba.jpg

  • Parrot Toes

    6 months will never happen. The wait time between sentencing and execution is necessary and on average is no earlier than 10 years any where in the States. It is getting longer and longer with time. The reasons for that are to accommodate all the appeals and whatever else comes up. I think it’s a great idea. The longer that a prisoner is on death row, the worse his mental anguish will be. Many of them attempt suicide because the mental anguish is so great. They spend 23 hours of each day in their small cells. They are isolated from all the other prisoners. Prison would suck, but life on death row would be Hell on Earth.

    Also, if there were any chance that the prisoner was innocent (it does and has happened), then hopefully that time will prove it one way or the other. It is incredibly sad for the victims and their friends and families for their loss, but it is equally sad for someone and their friends and family to be put to death if innocent.

    Here is a little chart for ya taken from http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/time-death-row which they got from somewhere on the Bureau of Justice Statistics site. It shows how the wait times have gone up since 1977 (well, since before then really, but this chart starts in ’77).

    http://i54.tinypic.com/1or2ba.jpg

  • Anonymous

    “Two death row inmates sued the state today, arguing that the decision to use a new lethal injection drug was made too secretly and too hastily.” http://www.the33tv.com/news/kdaf-death-row-inmates-sue-over-lethal-injection-drug-story,0,2188407.story
    Give me a fucking break…

  • Anonymous

    “Two death row inmates sued the state today, arguing that the decision to use a new lethal injection drug was made too secretly and too hastily.” http://www.the33tv.com/news/kdaf-death-row-inmates-sue-over-lethal-injection-drug-story,0,2188407.story
    Give me a fucking break…

  • Anonymous

    “Two death row inmates sued the state today, arguing that the decision to use a new lethal injection drug was made too secretly and too hastily.” http://www.the33tv.com/news/kdaf-death-row-inmates-sue-over-lethal-injection-drug-story,0,2188407.story
    Give me a fucking break…

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    You are correct Morbid … however (unless Texas just executed an innocent man – which I highly doubt) – to ask forgiveness one of the things one must do is admit sin/guilt.My understanding is that Cary Kerr went to his death still professing his innocence.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    You are correct Morbid … however (unless Texas just executed an innocent man – which I highly doubt) – to ask forgiveness one of the things one must do is admit sin/guilt.My understanding is that Cary Kerr went to his death still professing his innocence.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    You are correct Morbid … however (unless Texas just executed an innocent man – which I highly doubt) – to ask forgiveness one of the things one must do is admit sin/guilt.My understanding is that Cary Kerr went to his death still professing his innocence.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    You are correct Morbid … however (unless Texas just executed an innocent man – which I highly doubt) – to ask forgiveness one of the things one must do is admit sin/guilt.My understanding is that Cary Kerr went to his death still professing his innocence.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    You are correct Morbid … however (unless Texas just executed an innocent man – which I highly doubt) – to ask forgiveness one of the things one must do is admit sin/guilt.My understanding is that Cary Kerr went to his death still professing his innocence.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    You are correct Morbid … however (unless Texas just executed an innocent man – which I highly doubt) – to ask forgiveness one of the things one must do is admit sin/guilt.My understanding is that Cary Kerr went to his death still professing his innocence.

  • Anonymous

    “Pentobarbital will be the first of three drugs the state administers during an execution. It is an anesthetic, meant to render the inmate unconscious before the remaining two drugs stop the vital organs.”
    Wouldn’t it be more fun if we just left it out?

  • Anonymous

    “Pentobarbital will be the first of three drugs the state administers during an execution. It is an anesthetic, meant to render the inmate unconscious before the remaining two drugs stop the vital organs.”
    Wouldn’t it be more fun if we just left it out?

  • Anonymous

    “Pentobarbital will be the first of three drugs the state administers during an execution. It is an anesthetic, meant to render the inmate unconscious before the remaining two drugs stop the vital organs.”
    Wouldn’t it be more fun if we just left it out?

  • Anonymous

    “Pentobarbital will be the first of three drugs the state administers during an execution. It is an anesthetic, meant to render the inmate unconscious before the remaining two drugs stop the vital organs.”
    Wouldn’t it be more fun if we just left it out?

  • Anonymous

    “Pentobarbital will be the first of three drugs the state administers during an execution. It is an anesthetic, meant to render the inmate unconscious before the remaining two drugs stop the vital organs.”
    Wouldn’t it be more fun if we just left it out?

  • Anonymous

    “Pentobarbital will be the first of three drugs the state administers during an execution. It is an anesthetic, meant to render the inmate unconscious before the remaining two drugs stop the vital organs.”
    Wouldn’t it be more fun if we just left it out?

  • Anonymous

    “Pentobarbital will be the first of three drugs the state administers during an execution. It is an anesthetic, meant to render the inmate unconscious before the remaining two drugs stop the vital organs.”
    Wouldn’t it be more fun if we just left it out?

  • Anonymous

    “Pentobarbital will be the first of three drugs the state administers during an execution. It is an anesthetic, meant to render the inmate unconscious before the remaining two drugs stop the vital organs.”
    Wouldn’t it be more fun if we just left it out?

  • Anonymous

    “Pentobarbital will be the first of three drugs the state administers during an execution. It is an anesthetic, meant to render the inmate unconscious before the remaining two drugs stop the vital organs.”
    Wouldn’t it be more fun if we just left it out?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    Well … there is good and bad in everything … what you say would be bad for surviving victims and families of victims – as far as closure goes and also for taxpayers … but it would be good for possibly wrongly convicted inmates.Texas has recently freed a lot of wrongly convicted inmates with DNA testing.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    Well … there is good and bad in everything … what you say would be bad for surviving victims and families of victims – as far as closure goes and also for taxpayers … but it would be good for possibly wrongly convicted inmates.Texas has recently freed a lot of wrongly convicted inmates with DNA testing.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree some what with your point Gee … I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree some what with your point Gee … I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree some what with your point Gee … I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree some what with your point Gee … I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree some what with your point Gee … I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I was joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I totally support the death penalty,but I was only joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I totally support the death penalty,but I was only joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I totally support the death penalty,but I was only joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I totally support the death penalty,but I was only joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I totally support the death penalty,but I was only joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I totally support the death penalty,but I was only joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I totally support the death penalty,but I was only joking about the 6 months to execute.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    I agree.

  • Parrot Toes

    You may want to utilize emoticons or something next time. It’s hard to tell when someone is joking from typed words.

    Some examples:

    :P ….. :-p ……8D ……. :-D

  • http://www.dreamindemon.com Morbid

    That’s between him and his God, not him and man. I don’t recall the Bible saying that in order to get to Heaven, you must admit your sin to the public, only that you should ask for forgiveness from God. Unless there was a 12 Step program in there I missed.

  • Anonymous

    *clicks like button*

  • Anonymous

    *clicks like button*

  • Anonymous

    *clicks like button*

  • Anonymous

    If he had come clean for real to God he would have been burdened to come clean to the family of his victim. True faith changes everything about a person. It would have been the only way he could have obtained true peace.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    Hmm … not my style.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    Well once again you are correct Morbid … however since he mouth the words Jesus I would have to assume that he was referring to The one true God and I agree with what littlemoonseductress posted.A person who has confessed their sin onto God and truly repented and requested forgiveness – does not go to their death still professing innocence of the crime they are being put to death for committing if they are guilty.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    Well once again you are correct Morbid … however since he mouth the words Jesus I would have to assume that he was referring to The one true God and I agree with what littlemoonseductress posted.A person who has confessed their sin onto God and truly repented and requested forgiveness – does not go to their death still professing innocence of the crime they are being put to death for committing if they are guilty.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    Well once again you are correct Morbid … however since he mouth the words Jesus I would have to assume that he was referring to The one true God and I agree with what littlemoonseductress posted.A person who has confessed their sin onto God and truly repented and requested forgiveness – does not go to their death still professing innocence of the crime they are being put to death for committing if they are guilty.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_XKMAEMPVJ5T2Y35HKYTNG7I6SY Cedric

    Well once again you are correct Morbid … however since he mouth the words Jesus I would have to assume that he was referring to The one true God and I agree with what littlemoonseductress posted.A person who has confessed their sin onto God and truly repented and requested forgiveness – does not go to their death still professing innocence of the crime they are being put to death for committing if they are guilty.

  • Gee

    That is the part that is so scary how many didn’t get released…..

  • Gee

    That is the part that is so scary how many didn’t get released…..

  • Gee

    That is the part that is so scary how many didn’t get released…..

  • Anonymous

    Here’s some things you missed:

    bogas = BOGUS

    seaman = SEMEN

  • Anonymous

    Those fuckers all should be extremely glad they don’t get the death penalty like they gave it to their victims:

    RAPED, SODOMIZED, THROAT SLASHED, etc. WITHOUT ANY DRUGS TO NUMB THE PAIN.

  • Anonymous

    Those fuckers all should be extremely glad they don’t get the death penalty like they gave it to their victims:

    RAPED, SODOMIZED, THROAT SLASHED, etc. WITHOUT ANY DRUGS TO NUMB THE PAIN.

  • Anonymous

    Those fuckers all should be extremely glad they don’t get the death penalty like they gave it to their victims:

    RAPED, SODOMIZED, THROAT SLASHED, etc. WITHOUT ANY DRUGS TO NUMB THE PAIN.

  • Anonymous

    Those fuckers all should be extremely glad they don’t get the death penalty like they gave it to their victims:

    RAPED, SODOMIZED, THROAT SLASHED, etc. WITHOUT ANY DRUGS TO NUMB THE PAIN.

  • Anonymous

    Those fuckers all should be extremely glad they don’t get the death penalty like they gave it to their victims:

    RAPED, SODOMIZED, THROAT SLASHED, etc. WITHOUT ANY DRUGS TO NUMB THE PAIN.

  • Jury

    Wow, I’m glad your edjamacated.

  • Jury

    Wow, I’m glad your edjamacated.

  • Count Rackula

    Exactly! I’d love all involved in the Christian/Newsome murders to get EXACTLY what they dealt out. I’ll bet if we started doing that type of shit, it would be a great deterrent.

    But then, knowing humans, probably not.

  • Count Rackula

    Exactly! I’d love all involved in the Christian/Newsome murders to get EXACTLY what they dealt out. I’ll bet if we started doing that type of shit, it would be a great deterrent.

    But then, knowing humans, probably not.

  • Count Rackula

    Exactly! I’d love all involved in the Christian/Newsome murders to get EXACTLY what they dealt out. I’ll bet if we started doing that type of shit, it would be a great deterrent.

    But then, knowing humans, probably not.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Sade-May/1653757709 Sade May

    I highly doubt he joined all the other Christians in Heaven.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Sade-May/1653757709 Sade May

    I highly doubt he joined all the other Christians in Heaven.

  • Anonymous

    Deterrents don’t work unless people expect to get caught. And most criminals don’t expect to be caught, Lacking in imagination, if you ask me, but there you go.

  • Parrot Toes

    Jury……it’s you’re.

    *Cowers in fear* I’m kidding, I’m kidding. Don’t beat me!

    :P

  • Athena

    Precisely.

  • Athena

    Precisely.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Count Rackula

    Yeah, that’s kind of why I took that back at the end there; not only because of the fact that you just mentioned, but also because I’m sure there are those out there who would probably try to just get better at it, instead of fearing the consequences.

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Jury

    rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • Parrot Toes

    Hey! Leave my birdies outta this! They did nothing. Otherwise, I’m gonna send ‘em to poop on yer mom……and kids……and car……and everyone you know!

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_YT3XCVN3MHW2XXYB3OWU2A7GBU Patti

    I love a good death penalty story :)
    He shouldn’t have been given any kind of lethal injection, he should have butt fucked, strangled and tossed out the window of a moving car.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_PKSJ42VBXNAFJLOH54Y3K4KTXU Heather Habilatory

    Sayonara, motherfucker. May Hitler rape you in the ass for Eternity :)

    Did Hitler have a big penis? Anyone know?
    (Can’t believe those words just came from me, but whatevs….)

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_PKSJ42VBXNAFJLOH54Y3K4KTXU Heather Habilatory

    Sayonara, motherfucker. May Hitler rape you in the ass for Eternity :)

    Did Hitler have a big penis? Anyone know?
    (Can’t believe those words just came from me, but whatevs….)

  • Omalley

    Good Christ, why the hell’d they let him eat so much?!
    What a waste!

  • hershey

    Morbid, the victim’s name was Pamela Horton, not Norton.

  • hershey

    Morbid, the victim’s name was Pamela Horton, not Norton.

  • hershey

    Those that were wrongly convicted were from decades ago when DNA testing was not available. Now the DNA test is used in a courtroom to clear or convict, so it’s not likely the wrong guy is convicted now. As soon as the gavel hits, strap ‘em down.

    DISCLAIMER: I’m a Texan. :p

  • Anonymous

    How did you get a picture of my kitty? That is exactly what my cat looks like down to the irritated face. Your kitty is probably nice though…mine is very mean to everyone but me. It seriously bites, attacks, and rips the skin off all guests (human and animal).

  • hershey

    Yeah, just like the murders they committed were made too secretly and too hastily. Karma is a bitch, dudes.

  • pikeman

    Morbid and I have been through this conversation.

    He’s probably in for a rude awakening. He better have been truly sorry for what he did, (I doubt it) and really, really honest about his acceptance of Jesus. More than likely, he committed the unpardonable sin, blasphemy of the spirit, and he’s hell bound. The highway to hell. I’m not going to quote a bunch of Bible versus like I did in the past to Morbid. I’m not in the mood and I have too many beers in me.

    No Cedric, he’s probably in Hell explaining his views to Satan and pleading to God. It all falls on deaf ears.

    WELCOME TO HELL, CARY KERR!!!!

  • Athena

    While wrongful convictions are less likely these days, they’re far from impossible. DNA evidence can be corrupted, falsified, mishandled, or simply not collected or tested. In other cases, no DNA evidence is available.

    Texas has both likely executed an innocent man and fights to deny convicts’ ability to get DNA evidence that may exonerate them tested. Texas is a fine example of what NOT to do when a person’s life is in their hands.

  • Athena

    While wrongful convictions are less likely these days, they’re far from impossible. DNA evidence can be corrupted, falsified, mishandled, or simply not collected or tested. In other cases, no DNA evidence is available.

    Texas has both likely executed an innocent man and fights to deny convicts’ ability to get DNA evidence that may exonerate them tested. Texas is a fine example of what NOT to do when a person’s life is in their hands.

  • pikeman

    I’ve always thought it was a subconscious thing. Why do people in this country always say these things, and use God’s name vainly? I catch myself doing it too, even though I’m a Christian.

    Funny thing about that. In the Middle East, you don’t hear people yelling Mohammeddamnit. and Mohammed H Mohammed. I think that is because Europeans and North Americans subconsciously know that God is real. Otherwise, why would they continue to use Jesus’ and God’s name like that?

    I should just start using the Arabic God’s name in vain. MOHAMMED H MOHAMMED ON A CRUTCH!!

  • pikeman

    I’ve always thought it was a subconscious thing. Why do people in this country always say these things, and use God’s name vainly? I catch myself doing it too, even though I’m a Christian.

    Funny thing about that. In the Middle East, you don’t hear people yelling Mohammeddamnit. and Mohammed H Mohammed. I think that is because Europeans and North Americans subconsciously know that God is real. Otherwise, why would they continue to use Jesus’ and God’s name like that?

    I should just start using the Arabic God’s name in vain. MOHAMMED H MOHAMMED ON A CRUTCH!!

  • Anonymous

    After eating so much…what kind of dump did he take upon expiring?

  • Anonymous

    Sounds like in happier times he liked to eat at greasy spoons…

  • Anonymous

    Ugh the kind that NOBODY should have to clean up…thats just cruel.

  • Omalley

    I used to have a ragdoll kitty but that’s not a pic of him. He was a sweetheart, I still miss him…

  • Omalley

    I used to have a ragdoll kitty but that’s not a pic of him. He was a sweetheart, I still miss him…

  • Anonymous

    I love you for Mohammeddamnit.
    It’s like cursing, 80’s-funk style. “She’s a Bad Mohammeddamnit!”

  • Gee

    I agree with Athena about the possibility to convict the wrong person even still today. Even those convicted prior to DNA and then proven innocent after don’t just get out of jail. Point here is once convicted it is very difficult to get out even with strong DNA evidence proving your innocence. That’s not even including human error or over zealous detective/DA that just wanted a conviction. People have lost decades of their lives. Most people can not afford a decent lawyer so you get the public defender and you know what that gets you.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Trisha-Doran/1055147616 Trisha Doran

    Jeez they should be glad we don’t have a stabbing chair – whatever!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Trisha-Doran/1055147616 Trisha Doran

    Jeez they should be glad we don’t have a stabbing chair – whatever!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Trisha-Doran/1055147616 Trisha Doran

    Jeez they should be glad we don’t have a stabbing chair – whatever!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Trisha-Doran/1055147616 Trisha Doran

    Jeez they should be glad we don’t have a stabbing chair – whatever!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Trisha-Doran/1055147616 Trisha Doran

    Jeez they should be glad we don’t have a stabbing chair – whatever!

  • hershey

    Agreed, anything is possible. Texas denying convicts’ ability to test DNA doesn’t make sense to me either. I’m fairly certain all states have executed an innocent person at one time or another throughout history.

    Since we can’t trust law enforcement and judicial proceedings, what do you suggest? I know you are going to say do away with the death penalty, but if the person is truly innocent, we are still incarcerating that person for life. Granted, that’s better than extinguishing one’s life, but only slightly.

    Can anyone direct me to a web site where there is evidence of someone being wronged, not necessarily a death penalty case, with DNA evidence presented that was presumably tainted, corrupted, etc.

    In Kerr’s case, the state’s argument said he killed her, threw her body out on the road (next to his house), went to 7-11 to get some beer, cigs, and call 911, and finally go back to the crime scene, and exclaim, “wow, I just found a dead woman that I had sex with earlier.” (paraphrased using sarcasm)

    I was curious what made this a death penalty case in what seems to be a murder only, but the state presented that Kerr killed her and took money from her purse which he promptly bought the cigs and beer with. Along with stealing a day planner! (looks like the prosecutors were desperate). Murder only is not an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but robbery AND murder is worthy of death according the the great state of Texas. Oral copulation AND murder will also buy you a ticket to the gurney, which was also committed.

    Frankly, after reading this, I’m not sure he was guilty. Of course, this is a document to defend his innocence, so it is one-sided. There are some arguments that don’t quite make sense, but it certainly created a reasonable doubt in my mind.

    Should we say he was unfairly executed? Is this the price US citizens pay for having our peers judge us? I think when the stakes are this high, a panel of judicial experts should be your jury. Perhaps a criminal supreme court wouldn’t be a bad idea. Every US citizen should be worthy of that respect if he is to pay with his life.

  • hershey

    Agreed, anything is possible. Texas denying convicts’ ability to test DNA doesn’t make sense to me either. I’m fairly certain all states have executed an innocent person at one time or another throughout history.

    Since we can’t trust law enforcement and judicial proceedings, what do you suggest? I know you are going to say do away with the death penalty, but if the person is truly innocent, we are still incarcerating that person for life. Granted, that’s better than extinguishing one’s life, but only slightly.

    Can anyone direct me to a web site where there is evidence of someone being wronged, not necessarily a death penalty case, with DNA evidence presented that was presumably tainted, corrupted, etc.

    In Kerr’s case, the state’s argument said he killed her, threw her body out on the road (next to his house), went to 7-11 to get some beer, cigs, and call 911, and finally go back to the crime scene, and exclaim, “wow, I just found a dead woman that I had sex with earlier.” (paraphrased using sarcasm)

    I was curious what made this a death penalty case in what seems to be a murder only, but the state presented that Kerr killed her and took money from her purse which he promptly bought the cigs and beer with. Along with stealing a day planner! (looks like the prosecutors were desperate). Murder only is not an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but robbery AND murder is worthy of death according the the great state of Texas. Oral copulation AND murder will also buy you a ticket to the gurney, which was also committed.

    Frankly, after reading this, I’m not sure he was guilty. Of course, this is a document to defend his innocence, so it is one-sided. There are some arguments that don’t quite make sense, but it certainly created a reasonable doubt in my mind.

    Should we say he was unfairly executed? Is this the price US citizens pay for having our peers judge us? I think when the stakes are this high, a panel of judicial experts should be your jury. Perhaps a criminal supreme court wouldn’t be a bad idea. Every US citizen should be worthy of that respect if he is to pay with his life.

  • hershey

    Agreed, anything is possible. Texas denying convicts’ ability to test DNA doesn’t make sense to me either. I’m fairly certain all states have executed an innocent person at one time or another throughout history.

    Since we can’t trust law enforcement and judicial proceedings, what do you suggest? I know you are going to say do away with the death penalty, but if the person is truly innocent, we are still incarcerating that person for life. Granted, that’s better than extinguishing one’s life, but only slightly.

    Can anyone direct me to a web site where there is evidence of someone being wronged, not necessarily a death penalty case, with DNA evidence presented that was presumably tainted, corrupted, etc.

    In Kerr’s case, the state’s argument said he killed her, threw her body out on the road (next to his house), went to 7-11 to get some beer, cigs, and call 911, and finally go back to the crime scene, and exclaim, “wow, I just found a dead woman that I had sex with earlier.” (paraphrased using sarcasm)

    I was curious what made this a death penalty case in what seems to be a murder only, but the state presented that Kerr killed her and took money from her purse which he promptly bought the cigs and beer with. Along with stealing a day planner! (looks like the prosecutors were desperate). Murder only is not an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but robbery AND murder is worthy of death according the the great state of Texas. Oral copulation AND murder will also buy you a ticket to the gurney, which was also committed.

    Frankly, after reading this, I’m not sure he was guilty. Of course, this is a document to defend his innocence, so it is one-sided. There are some arguments that don’t quite make sense, but it certainly created a reasonable doubt in my mind.

    Should we say he was unfairly executed? Is this the price US citizens pay for having our peers judge us? I think when the stakes are this high, a panel of judicial experts should be your jury. Perhaps a criminal supreme court wouldn’t be a bad idea. Every US citizen should be worthy of that respect if he is to pay with his life.

  • hershey

    Agreed, anything is possible. Texas denying convicts’ ability to test DNA doesn’t make sense to me either. I’m fairly certain all states have executed an innocent person at one time or another throughout history.

    Since we can’t trust law enforcement and judicial proceedings, what do you suggest? I know you are going to say do away with the death penalty, but if the person is truly innocent, we are still incarcerating that person for life. Granted, that’s better than extinguishing one’s life, but only slightly.

    Can anyone direct me to a web site where there is evidence of someone being wronged, not necessarily a death penalty case, with DNA evidence presented that was presumably tainted, corrupted, etc.

    In Kerr’s case, the state’s argument said he killed her, threw her body out on the road (next to his house), went to 7-11 to get some beer, cigs, and call 911, and finally go back to the crime scene, and exclaim, “wow, I just found a dead woman that I had sex with earlier.” (paraphrased using sarcasm)

    I was curious what made this a death penalty case in what seems to be a murder only, but the state presented that Kerr killed her and took money from her purse which he promptly bought the cigs and beer with. Along with stealing a day planner! (looks like the prosecutors were desperate). Murder only is not an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but robbery AND murder is worthy of death according the the great state of Texas. Oral copulation AND murder will also buy you a ticket to the gurney, which was also committed.

    Frankly, after reading this, I’m not sure he was guilty. Of course, this is a document to defend his innocence, so it is one-sided. There are some arguments that don’t quite make sense, but it certainly created a reasonable doubt in my mind.

    Should we say he was unfairly executed? Is this the price US citizens pay for having our peers judge us? I think when the stakes are this high, a panel of judicial experts should be your jury. Perhaps a criminal supreme court wouldn’t be a bad idea. Every US citizen should be worthy of that respect if he is to pay with his life.

  • hershey

    Agreed, anything is possible. Texas denying convicts’ ability to test DNA doesn’t make sense to me either. I’m fairly certain all states have executed an innocent person at one time or another throughout history.

    Since we can’t trust law enforcement and judicial proceedings, what do you suggest? I know you are going to say do away with the death penalty, but if the person is truly innocent, we are still incarcerating that person for life. Granted, that’s better than extinguishing one’s life, but only slightly.

    Can anyone direct me to a web site where there is evidence of someone being wronged, not necessarily a death penalty case, with DNA evidence presented that was presumably tainted, corrupted, etc.

    In Kerr’s case, the state’s argument said he killed her, threw her body out on the road (next to his house), went to 7-11 to get some beer, cigs, and call 911, and finally go back to the crime scene, and exclaim, “wow, I just found a dead woman that I had sex with earlier.” (paraphrased using sarcasm)

    I was curious what made this a death penalty case in what seems to be a murder only, but the state presented that Kerr killed her and took money from her purse which he promptly bought the cigs and beer with. Along with stealing a day planner! (looks like the prosecutors were desperate). Murder only is not an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but robbery AND murder is worthy of death according the the great state of Texas. Oral copulation AND murder will also buy you a ticket to the gurney, which was also committed.

    Frankly, after reading this, I’m not sure he was guilty. Of course, this is a document to defend his innocence, so it is one-sided. There are some arguments that don’t quite make sense, but it certainly created a reasonable doubt in my mind.

    Should we say he was unfairly executed? Is this the price US citizens pay for having our peers judge us? I think when the stakes are this high, a panel of judicial experts should be your jury. Perhaps a criminal supreme court wouldn’t be a bad idea. Every US citizen should be worthy of that respect if he is to pay with his life.

  • hershey

    Agreed, anything is possible. Texas denying convicts’ ability to test DNA doesn’t make sense to me either. I’m fairly certain all states have executed an innocent person at one time or another throughout history.

    Since we can’t trust law enforcement and judicial proceedings, what do you suggest? I know you are going to say do away with the death penalty, but if the person is truly innocent, we are still incarcerating that person for life. Granted, that’s better than extinguishing one’s life, but only slightly.

    Can anyone direct me to a web site where there is evidence of someone being wronged, not necessarily a death penalty case, with DNA evidence presented that was presumably tainted, corrupted, etc.

    In Kerr’s case, the state’s argument said he killed her, threw her body out on the road (next to his house), went to 7-11 to get some beer, cigs, and call 911, and finally go back to the crime scene, and exclaim, “wow, I just found a dead woman that I had sex with earlier.” (paraphrased using sarcasm)

    I was curious what made this a death penalty case in what seems to be a murder only, but the state presented that Kerr killed her and took money from her purse which he promptly bought the cigs and beer with. Along with stealing a day planner! (looks like the prosecutors were desperate). Murder only is not an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but robbery AND murder is worthy of death according the the great state of Texas. Oral copulation AND murder will also buy you a ticket to the gurney, which was also committed.

    Frankly, after reading this, I’m not sure he was guilty. Of course, this is a document to defend his innocence, so it is one-sided. There are some arguments that don’t quite make sense, but it certainly created a reasonable doubt in my mind.

    Should we say he was unfairly executed? Is this the price US citizens pay for having our peers judge us? I think when the stakes are this high, a panel of judicial experts should be your jury. Perhaps a criminal supreme court wouldn’t be a bad idea. Every US citizen should be worthy of that respect if he is to pay with his life.

  • hershey

    Agreed, anything is possible. Texas denying convicts’ ability to test DNA doesn’t make sense to me either. I’m fairly certain all states have executed an innocent person at one time or another throughout history.

    Since we can’t trust law enforcement and judicial proceedings, what do you suggest? I know you are going to say do away with the death penalty, but if the person is truly innocent, we are still incarcerating that person for life. Granted, that’s better than extinguishing one’s life, but only slightly.

    Can anyone direct me to a web site where there is evidence of someone being wronged, not necessarily a death penalty case, with DNA evidence presented that was presumably tainted, corrupted, etc.

    In Kerr’s case, the state’s argument said he killed her, threw her body out on the road (next to his house), went to 7-11 to get some beer, cigs, and call 911, and finally go back to the crime scene, and exclaim, “wow, I just found a dead woman that I had sex with earlier.” (paraphrased using sarcasm)

    I was curious what made this a death penalty case in what seems to be a murder only, but the state presented that Kerr killed her and took money from her purse which he promptly bought the cigs and beer with. Along with stealing a day planner! (looks like the prosecutors were desperate). Murder only is not an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but robbery AND murder is worthy of death according the the great state of Texas. Oral copulation AND murder will also buy you a ticket to the gurney, which was also committed.

    Frankly, after reading this, I’m not sure he was guilty. Of course, this is a document to defend his innocence, so it is one-sided. There are some arguments that don’t quite make sense, but it certainly created a reasonable doubt in my mind.

    Should we say he was unfairly executed? Is this the price US citizens pay for having our peers judge us? I think when the stakes are this high, a panel of judicial experts should be your jury. Perhaps a criminal supreme court wouldn’t be a bad idea. Every US citizen should be worthy of that respect if he is to pay with his life.

  • hershey

    Agreed, anything is possible. Texas denying convicts’ ability to test DNA doesn’t make sense to me either. I’m fairly certain all states have executed an innocent person at one time or another throughout history.

    Since we can’t trust law enforcement and judicial proceedings, what do you suggest? I know you are going to say do away with the death penalty, but if the person is truly innocent, we are still incarcerating that person for life. Granted, that’s better than extinguishing one’s life, but only slightly.

    Can anyone direct me to a web site where there is evidence of someone being wronged, not necessarily a death penalty case, with DNA evidence presented that was presumably tainted, corrupted, etc.

    In Kerr’s case, the state’s argument said he killed her, threw her body out on the road (next to his house), went to 7-11 to get some beer, cigs, and call 911, and finally go back to the crime scene, and exclaim, “wow, I just found a dead woman that I had sex with earlier.” (paraphrased using sarcasm)

    I was curious what made this a death penalty case in what seems to be a murder only, but the state presented that Kerr killed her and took money from her purse which he promptly bought the cigs and beer with. Along with stealing a day planner! (looks like the prosecutors were desperate). Murder only is not an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but robbery AND murder is worthy of death according the the great state of Texas. Oral copulation AND murder will also buy you a ticket to the gurney, which was also committed.

    Frankly, after reading this, I’m not sure he was guilty. Of course, this is a document to defend his innocence, so it is one-sided. There are some arguments that don’t quite make sense, but it certainly created a reasonable doubt in my mind.

    Should we say he was unfairly executed? Is this the price US citizens pay for having our peers judge us? I think when the stakes are this high, a panel of judicial experts should be your jury. Perhaps a criminal supreme court wouldn’t be a bad idea. Every US citizen should be worthy of that respect if he is to pay with his life.

  • hershey

    Agreed, anything is possible. Texas denying convicts’ ability to test DNA doesn’t make sense to me either. I’m fairly certain all states have executed an innocent person at one time or another throughout history.

    Since we can’t trust law enforcement and judicial proceedings, what do you suggest? I know you are going to say do away with the death penalty, but if the person is truly innocent, we are still incarcerating that person for life. Granted, that’s better than extinguishing one’s life, but only slightly.

    Can anyone direct me to a web site where there is evidence of someone being wronged, not necessarily a death penalty case, with DNA evidence presented that was presumably tainted, corrupted, etc.

    In Kerr’s case, the state’s argument said he killed her, threw her body out on the road (next to his house), went to 7-11 to get some beer, cigs, and call 911, and finally go back to the crime scene, and exclaim, “wow, I just found a dead woman that I had sex with earlier.” (paraphrased using sarcasm)

    I was curious what made this a death penalty case in what seems to be a murder only, but the state presented that Kerr killed her and took money from her purse which he promptly bought the cigs and beer with. Along with stealing a day planner! (looks like the prosecutors were desperate). Murder only is not an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but robbery AND murder is worthy of death according the the great state of Texas. Oral copulation AND murder will also buy you a ticket to the gurney, which was also committed.

    Frankly, after reading this, I’m not sure he was guilty. Of course, this is a document to defend his innocence, so it is one-sided. There are some arguments that don’t quite make sense, but it certainly created a reasonable doubt in my mind.

    Should we say he was unfairly executed? Is this the price US citizens pay for having our peers judge us? I think when the stakes are this high, a panel of judicial experts should be your jury. Perhaps a criminal supreme court wouldn’t be a bad idea. Every US citizen should be worthy of that respect if he is to pay with his life.

  • hershey

    Agreed, anything is possible. Texas denying convicts’ ability to test DNA doesn’t make sense to me either. I’m fairly certain all states have executed an innocent person at one time or another throughout history.

    Since we can’t trust law enforcement and judicial proceedings, what do you suggest? I know you are going to say do away with the death penalty, but if the person is truly innocent, we are still incarcerating that person for life. Granted, that’s better than extinguishing one’s life, but only slightly.

    Can anyone direct me to a web site where there is evidence of someone being wronged, not necessarily a death penalty case, with DNA evidence presented that was presumably tainted, corrupted, etc.

    In Kerr’s case, the state’s argument said he killed her, threw her body out on the road (next to his house), went to 7-11 to get some beer, cigs, and call 911, and finally go back to the crime scene, and exclaim, “wow, I just found a dead woman that I had sex with earlier.” (paraphrased using sarcasm)

    I was curious what made this a death penalty case in what seems to be a murder only, but the state presented that Kerr killed her and took money from her purse which he promptly bought the cigs and beer with. Along with stealing a day planner! (looks like the prosecutors were desperate). Murder only is not an aggravating factor for the death penalty, but robbery AND murder is worthy of death according the the great state of Texas. Oral copulation AND murder will also buy you a ticket to the gurney, which was also committed.

    Frankly, after reading this, I’m not sure he was guilty. Of course, this is a document to defend his innocence, so it is one-sided. There are some arguments that don’t quite make sense, but it certainly created a reasonable doubt in my mind.

    Should we say he was unfairly executed? Is this the price US citizens pay for having our peers judge us? I think when the stakes are this high, a panel of judicial experts should be your jury. Perhaps a criminal supreme court wouldn’t be a bad idea. Every US citizen should be worthy of that respect if he is to pay with his life.

  • Anonymous

    What is really scary is that Texas is notorious for executing innocent men, so none of us will ever really know if this man did it or not, what we do know is that he is now dead, just like a peice of meat in a grocery store… worm food…

  • Anonymous

    Well unless he was cremated after the procedure…then he is just another
    piece of dust being sucked into our lungs, landing on the furniture, falling
    into the food supply…yuk.

  • Anonymous

    @Hershey check out http://www.innocenceproject.org/
    @hershey61:disqus

    lots of cases there…. if I could live my life over I would be a lawyer and work for free for these people….

  • Anonymous

    and pour some bleach down their throats too before they die, to kill the dna you know… and just suffocate them with plastic bags and take their shit they were donating to the poor…. I dont want to go here again, that family, especially the father has been destroyed, because his daughter called him crying for help and he couldnt find where she was, the mom is the only one just barely holding it all together, I hated seeing the killers in court with their phony tears and sorry ass sadshit stories and that bitch Vanessa Coleman should be stripped of womanhood because she is no woman., do not even get me started on this story…

  • hershey

    I read about 10 from the innocence project site. None of the people incarcerated were arrested due to tainted or corrupted DNA evidence which is what I am seeking. In fact, the innocence project uses DNA evidence to exonerate the innocent who have been incarcerated. Two cases of the cases that I read involved the rapes of white women by black men before DNA was used and the men were found guilty only due to the women identifying the men in a line up. As it has been widely documented, people are not that great at identifying the features of races different than themselves. Thankfully, DNA exonerates these types of cases. Unfortunately, it is 15 years too late. The innocence project is one of the worthiest endeavors ever created for mankind, imho.

    Before someone mentions OJ as a case that involved tainted evidence, I will argue that 1) he was not charged and 2) the crime scene had a big fat OJ shoe size Bruno Magli (type of very expensive shoe that he owned) shoe print in the blood. In this case, the attorneys used tainted DNA evidence as a defense, not to prosecute.

    Barry Scheck, one of the OJ attorneys is the co-founder of the innocence project.

  • Athena

    Here’s one of the better known cases that I’m aware of.

    Here’s the problem with DNA evidence today. It is sometimes suppressed, legally or illegally, by the prosecution. Sometimes it isn’t discovered until after a conviction. In these cases, the convicted is typically responsible to pay for any post-conviction testing, and that’s only after fighting to even get access to said evidence (it’s far from automatic). For most of these convicts who are broke, either poor enough for public defense or individuals whose families spent every last dime on their defense, how are they supposed to come up with that money?

    Since you asked earlier, yes, I think we should do away with the death penalty. Do you know why there’s a new cocktail for lethal injection? Why sodium thiopental is no longer available? It’s because was made in Italy, and Italian authorities demanded a guarantee from the manufacturer (a U.S. company) that it would not be used for lethal injection, as lethal injection is banned by the E.U. Hospira, the manufacturer, could not give that guarantee, so they just halted production.

    See, if you look at the map of countries and their capital punishment status, you will see that, for the most part, the only other countries that utilize the DP like we do are in Africa, the Middle East and SE Asia. Of those countries, the ones that use it as often as we do include awesome countries like China, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Pakistan. Those round out the top 5. With friends like that…

    My bottom line is this: I have no moral qualms with executing the guilty. Hell, if I had 100% assurance of guilt, I’d do it myself. However, I am not prepared to sacrifice any of my family members for the right of our government to kill the guilty. Are you?

    While our emotion and bloodlust provokes us to cheer for states like Texas (or any state with the death penalty), the civil world is moving in another direction entirely. And not to protect the rights of the guilty… To protect the rights of the innocent. Yes, life in prison is not much better, but it is better. Instead of 10 years to hope for technology to get better, laws to change, or family to raise funds, you get 20, 30, 40 years. Your odds have increased dramatically. Everything we do in criminal justice is to protect the innocent. The convicted should not be forgotten in all of this.

  • Athena

    Here’s one of the better known cases that I’m aware of.

    Here’s the problem with DNA evidence today. It is sometimes suppressed, legally or illegally, by the prosecution. Sometimes it isn’t discovered until after a conviction. In these cases, the convicted is typically responsible to pay for any post-conviction testing, and that’s only after fighting to even get access to said evidence (it’s far from automatic). For most of these convicts who are broke, either poor enough for public defense or individuals whose families spent every last dime on their defense, how are they supposed to come up with that money?

    Since you asked earlier, yes, I think we should do away with the death penalty. Do you know why there’s a new cocktail for lethal injection? Why sodium thiopental is no longer available? It’s because was made in Italy, and Italian authorities demanded a guarantee from the manufacturer (a U.S. company) that it would not be used for lethal injection, as lethal injection is banned by the E.U. Hospira, the manufacturer, could not give that guarantee, so they just halted production.

    See, if you look at the map of countries and their capital punishment status, you will see that, for the most part, the only other countries that utilize the DP like we do are in Africa, the Middle East and SE Asia. Of those countries, the ones that use it as often as we do include awesome countries like China, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Pakistan. Those round out the top 5. With friends like that…

    My bottom line is this: I have no moral qualms with executing the guilty. Hell, if I had 100% assurance of guilt, I’d do it myself. However, I am not prepared to sacrifice any of my family members for the right of our government to kill the guilty. Are you?

    While our emotion and bloodlust provokes us to cheer for states like Texas (or any state with the death penalty), the civil world is moving in another direction entirely. And not to protect the rights of the guilty… To protect the rights of the innocent. Yes, life in prison is not much better, but it is better. Instead of 10 years to hope for technology to get better, laws to change, or family to raise funds, you get 20, 30, 40 years. Your odds have increased dramatically. Everything we do in criminal justice is to protect the innocent. The convicted should not be forgotten in all of this.

  • Pingback: Germany denies America drug for killing its citizens | iToD Daily()